Classic Rome Highlights

The Pantheon

They say that all roads lead to Rome. Well, we finally made it to the Eternal City, so it must be true. In our case, we traveled the long way around through Asia and South America literally taking every road known to man to get here. And to celebrate our victory, we spent one glorious month exploring Rome’s amazing architectural and artistic treasures as well as delving into the city’s exciting culinary world.

We quickly realized that Rome is positively overwhelming. The number of churches, Roman temples, gelaterias, street markets, fountains, villas, galleries, museums, and piazzas made our heads spin. We could spend years here exploring and never see it all.

For that reason, it’s even more crucial to plan your itinerary beforehand to get the most out of your visit. To help out a bit, we will be highlighting some of our favorite attractions both on and off the well-trodden Roman path. To begin, let’s start with the classics! Continue…

Plan your Visit to Leonardo da Vinci’s Last Supper

Leonardo Da Vinci's The Last Supper in Milan

The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci is arguably the second most famous painting in the world after that other da Vinci masterpiece, the Mona Lisa. The superstar 15th-century mural is probably the most duplicated painting on the planet. It shows up on posters, placemats, calendars, coffee cups, mouse pads and any other flat surface humanity can print a picture on. We have personally spotted this painting everywhere from Hong Kong to Las Vegas, from Buenos Aires to Nairobi. It’s everywhere. For that reason, it has become one of Milan’s most famous attractions. Unfortunately, many visitors never get to see it.

When da Vinci was asked to paint The Last Supper on a wall in the refectory of the Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie, he chose to paint on dry wall rather than on wet plaster as is traditionally done in frescoes. This meant that the famous painting started to deteriorate almost immediately after he finished it. As if that weren’t problem enough, the painting has a history of abuse which would be laughable if it weren’t so sad. French troops actually Continue…